Patterns of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Population Change

The U.S. Census Bureau released a beautiful thing recently – a report of the urbanization processes in America.  And, more importantly, it comes with LOTS of beautiful chloropeth maps to make any geographer or social scientist excited.

I wanted to share some interesting maps (and please note, they are all chopped directly out of the above-linked PDF) and some commentary on them.  For those waiting for an update on my MOOC experience, I will be posting about that later this week.

First, America, as a country is growing roughly at a rate of around 10% (per decade).  It’s pretty clear what the recent trends are.

Percentage Change in Population by CBSA – 2000 to 2010

The growth is spread rather evenly across larger cities – and not so much around the smaller cities.

Percentage Change in Population by CBSA Status and Pop Size Category – 2000 to 2010

Katrina’s toll is noted…

CBSA with Fastest Growth and Decline in Total Population 2000 to 2010

And there are clear patterns of suburbanization, but also some CBD growth in the next few maps:

Percentage Change in Population by Census Tract – 2000 to 2010 (DFW and Phoenix)
Percentage Change in Population by Census Tract – 2000 to 2010 (Detroit and STL)
Numeric Change in Population by Census Tract – 2000 to 2010 (Chicago and NYC)
Metropolitan Statistical Areas with the Larges Numeric Increase and Decline in Population Less than 2 miles from City Hall – 2000 to 2010

And last, the country is changing demographically rather dramatically.

Numeric Change in Population by Race and Hispanic Origin – 2000 to 2010
Race and Hispanic Origin as a Percentage of Total Population by CBSA – 2010
Race and Hispanic Origin as a Percentage of Total Population by CBSA – 2010
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4 thoughts on “Patterns of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Population Change

  1. Interesting to see that white people are leaving the really big cities. There is also a substantial population growth in places like Utah and Colorado that were recently ranked as very high in future livability by a Gallup survey. I wonder if that is a white flight from LA to these states.

  2. I wouldn’t be surprised – people who made a lot of money in LA or San Francisco moving to UT/AZ/etc., and now looking to take advantage of those regions’ low cost of living.

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